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Heidegger and a Hippo Walk Through Those Pearly Gates: Using Philosophy (and Jokes!) to Explore Life, Death, the Afterlife, and Everything in Between

 
 
 
 
Heidegger and a Hippo Walk Through Those Pearly Gates: Using Philosophy (and Jokes!) to Explore Life, Death, the Afterlife, and Everything in Between
Author: Thomas Cathcart - Daniel Klein
ISBN 13: 9780143118251
ISBN 10: 143118250
Edition: Reprint
Publisher: Penguin Books
Publication Date: 2010-10-26
Format: Paperback
Pages: 256
List Price: $13.00
 
 

Q. Why are there almost as many jokes about death as there are about sex?

A. Because they both scare the pants off us.

Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein first made a name for themselves with the outrageously funny New York Times bestseller Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar. Now they turn their attention to the Big D and share the timeless wisdom of the great philosophers, theologians, psychotherapists, and wiseguys. From angels to zombies and everything in between, Cathcart and Klein offer a fearless and irreverent history of how we approach death, why we embrace life, and whether there really is a hereafter. As hilarious as it is enlightening, Heidegger and a Hippo Walk Through Those Pearly Gates is a must-read for anyone and everyone who ever expects to die.

The Barnes & Noble Review

What do you do with a degree in philosophy? Some of us choose to become critics, but we're fortunate that others, like Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein, go in for what they call "philogagging" -- telling jokes that illuminate often abstruse ideas about the nature of existence. The pair dedicated their last book, Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar: Understanding Philosophy Through Jokes (2007) to their "philosophical grandfather," Groucho Marx.

Heidegger and a Hippo Walk Through Those Pearly Gates, a sort of Everything You Wanted to Know About Death But Are Sorry You Asked, hails their "philosophical mentor," king of the philogaggers, Woody Allen. As descendants of Socrates and Plato -- and comedians in need of a straight man -- the authors naturally structure their discourse as a dialogue. They kick off their discussion with the question, "Do you really think you're going to die?" Their point is that "We are the only creatures who comprehend that we are going to die and we are also the only creatures who can imagine living forever. It's that combo that drives us crazy."

Mixing jokes, bad puns, simplified philosophical exposition, somewhat tiresome patter, and New Yorker cartoons like those collected by Mort Gerberg in Last Laughs, Cathcart and Klein touch on RenÚ Descartes's dualism of mind and matter, Paul Tillich's "eternal now," Friedrich Nietzsche's "eternal recurrence," S°ren Kierkegarrd's "streetcar named despair," and "the Eternal Fruitcake Conundrum." There's more schtick than meat to their routine this time around, and their straight man, mortician Daryl Frumkin, is pretty lame. But the gallows humor is rich. My favorite joke, illustrating the will to live: A Death Row prisoner requests strawberries for his last meal. Told they're out of season, he says, "No problem. I'll wait." --Heller McAlpin