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Intuition: Its Powers and Perils (Yale Nota Bene)

 
 
 
 
Intuition: Its Powers and Perils (Yale Nota Bene)
Author: David G. Myers
ISBN 13: 9780300103038
ISBN 10: 300103034
Edition: New edition
Publisher: Yale University Press
Publication Date: 2004-04-10
Format: Paperback
Pages: 336
List Price: $25.00
 
 

"Myers' book brilliantly establishes intuition as a legitimate subject of scientific inquiry."-Michael Shermer, Los Angeles Times Book Review;"A lively and thorough review of the powers and pitfalls of gut instinct."-Eric Bonabeau, Harvard Business Review ;"[Intuition is a book] that may help you make optimal use of your intuition. . . . [It] offers scientific grounding in the subject and practical steps for becoming more intelligently intuitive."-Money Magazine's e-mail newsletter; "Delightfully readable and deliberately provocative."—Publishers Weekly; "Entertaining, intelligent, and easy to read, Myers's book offers an abundance of research findings dealing with what is more aptly called the 'nonconscious' mind." - Choice; "Intuition is a one-of-a-kind book by one of the best writers in psychology. Exceptionally reasonable, totally up-to-date, and responsible, the book has the potential to be a classic in the field." - Robert J. Sternberg, 2003 president, American Psychological Assocation

Author Biography: David G. Myers, John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology at Hope College, is also the author of The American Paradox: Spiritual Hunger in an Age of Plenty and A Quiet World: Living With Hearing Loss, both published by Yale University Press.

Also available by David G. Myers: The American Paradox

The Los Angeles Times

Myers' demonstration that intuition cannot be trusted triggered my own confirmation bias: Everyone knows that intuition is just mushy New Age nonsense. But as Myers demonstrates through countless well-documented experiments, our intuitions about intuition may be wrong. There is something else going on in the brain. That something else, for lack of a better word (and I do wish there were a better word), is intuition, or what Myers defines as "our capacity for direct knowledge, for immediate insight without observation or reason." — Michael Shermer