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Cocaine: An Unauthorized Biography

 
 
 
 
Cocaine: An Unauthorized Biography
Author: Dominic Streatfeild
ISBN 13: 9780312422264
ISBN 10: 312422261
Edition: Reprint
Publisher: Picador
Publication Date: 2003-07-01
Format: Paperback
Pages: 528
List Price: $22.00
 
 

Over the course of two years, London-based documentary film maker and writer Streatfeild interviewed some 150 traffickers, scientists, academics, journalists, officials of the US customs and drug agencies; he talked to people in the US, Bolivia, Columbia, and Peru. His book is an engaging account of the drugs' history and ongoing impact. This is a paperbound reprint of a 2001 book. Distributed in the US by Palgrave. Annotation ©2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Publishers Weekly

Boil off Streatfeild's informal tone a mix of self-deprecation and gonzo-journalist swagger and what's left is a fascinating and richly detailed story of the world's most notorious drug and an illicit $92-billion-a-year industry. Streatfeild, a British documentary film producer, visits its every outpost, from Bronx crack houses and Amazonian coca plantations to Bolivian prisons and the compounds of South American drug lords. He launches the story with a history of the coca leaf and its prominent place in both ancient and contemporary consciousness, tackling race, poverty, class, violence, mythology and xenophobia as seen through the prism of cocaine. There are countless strands to the story, and Streatfeild follows every one: the rise of the Colombian cartels, government collusion with traffickers, the crack phenomenon, media hype, the U.S. war on drugs and the legalization debate. The author lights up the myriad figures who feature in cocaine's history: Columbus, Freud, Pablo Escobar, Manuel Noriega, George Jung, even Richard Pryor and the late basketball star Len Bias. He picks the brains of botanists and economists, lawmen and guerrillas, addicts and kingpins, and travels extensively throughout the Americas. The main drawback: Streatfeild's insistence that the reader be privy to superfluous research details such as fizzled leads, false starts, wrong turns and boring authors. In the end, though, Streatfeild delivers a straight tale about a world where nothing is as it seems. (June) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.