Textbook

Books Price Comparison (Including Amazon) - Guaranteed Lowest Prices on Books


 

The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook--What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love, and Healing

 
 
 
 
The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook--What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love, and Healing
Author: Bruce Perry - Maia Szalavitz
ISBN 13: 9780465056538
ISBN 10: 465056539
Edition: Reprint
Publisher: Basic Books
Publication Date: 2007-12-25
Format: Paperback
Pages: 288
List Price: $16.99
 
 

A world-renowned child psychiatrist takes us inside his pioneering work with trauma victims to offer a groundbreaking new perspective on how stress and violence affect children’s brains-and how they can be helped to heal

KLIATT

Children who suffer early trauma seem to have different rates of recovery, and some never recover. In this collection of stories, Dr. Perry tells of a number of children he helped. Most had difficult or even horrible childhoods, often full of misguided parenting, abandonment, or torture. Through the stories, he teaches the reader about the human brain and how it can be hurt and healed. In a number of stories, he tells of similar situations with different outcomes. He tells the story of Leon, who at the age of 16 rapes and murders two young girls. Leon was raised by a well-meaning mother who successfully raised an older sibling; the biggest difference was that when the mother (who was mentally impaired) lost her support system, she didn't understand the impact of leaving the younger boy alone, and basically abandoned the baby during the day. Another child was also left home alone in his crib by the caretaker/cousin hired by his parents, who didn't discover his neglect for over a year. This child was able to recover because he had some affection and care when his parents were home. Peter was raised in an orphanage in Russia for three years that left him infantile in some ways and developed beyond his years in others. Dr. Perry actually trained his first grade classmates to understand brain development so that they could help Peter gain the steps he was missing. The boy in the title story was raised by his grandmother his first year, but when she died, he was left with a step-grandfather who only knew how to raise dogs and treated the child like a dog, leaving him in a crate most of the time. Dr. Perry shows great understanding and respect for these children, which enabled him tocomprehend their level of development and help them move forward. Reviewer: Nola Theiss