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Durable Inequality (Irene Flecknoe Ross Lecture)

 
 
 
 
Durable Inequality (Irene Flecknoe Ross Lecture)
Author: Charles Tilly
ISBN 13: 9780520221703
ISBN 10: 520221702
Edition: Revised ed.
Publisher: University of California Press
Publication Date: 1999-09-01
Format: Paperback
Pages: 310
List Price: $31.95
 
 

"Durable
Inquality
solidifies Charles Tilly's reputation as one of the world's most creative social scientists. It is a work of considerable theoretical scope and imagination. Tilly's original framework clearly reveals and thoroughly explains the similar social processes that create different forms of social inequality."—William Julius Wilson, author of The Truly Disadvantaged

"A highly sophisticated yet extremely accessible reconstruction of a core sociological problem. . . . Durable
Inequality
is one of those exceptional books that provides both a compelling rereading of familiar issues and an inspiring vision for future research."—Elisabeth S. Clemens, author of The People's Lobby

"
In a refreshing book characterized by deep insight into social structure and relations and displaying a rich historical sweep, Tilly has constructed a major challenge to contemporary individualistic interpretations of persistent economic inequality."—Richard A. Easterlin, author of Growth Triumphant

"Clearly the work of a master. . . . The book provides a new and rigorous understanding of one of the key facts of social life."—Bruce G. Carruthers, author of City of Capital

"The insights in this book offer the opportunity to revitalize the study of social stratification with a version of organizational theory, and reconnect both to political sociology."—Neil Fligstein, author of The Transformation of Corporate Control

William Julius Wilson

Solidifies Charles Tilly's reputation as one of the world's most creative social scientists....Tilly's original framework clearly reveals and thoroughly explains the similar social processes that create different forms of social inequality. -- William Julius Wilson